ALICE, A Psychological Thriller

Reg’d © Library of Congress
"To kill a human being is after all the least injury you can do him."—Henry James 
Jekyll & Ms Hyde: A schizophrenia drug turns Alice into the monster she needs to be to deal with a murderer.

When a writer kills his editor by letting him back in front of a taxi, no one sees but the editor’s lover and colleague, Alice. But how can she prove it?

She inherits the writer’s book, and him as a lover, and plays a sinister game with him, threatening to electrocute him in her shower: which will win, love or death?

But then, angered by his infidelity, she actually tries to kill him, and fails, and falls into depression. And when he does die in there by accident it’s as if she had done it.

His abandoned girlfriend thinks she did, puts her on antipsychotic drugs that change her grotesquely, holds the “murder” over her head—and kills Alice’s boss.  And frames Alice.

And Alice, to survive, must release that murderer we all have inside.
Book editor Alice takes her lover’s murderer, novelist Bill, to bed, but warns him, when he’s about to shower, to turn off the power: there’s a short in the system.  He could die.  That, she tells him, is how she’s going to kill him.
Seduced by this danger Bill moves in with her, their lives spiced by the running joke of his impending death until he does die, all on his own, but just the way she had told him she’d do it—

—and just the way he’d told Beryl she’d do it.  Beryl supports Bill's writing career with her work as a nurse till he leaves her for Alice.  She adores him, and now feels not only vengeful but snubbed, left out of the games these high-toned people play.
Kenyon is Alice's junior associate and protégé at the publishing company, and her lover.  When he quits his job over his inability to get along with Bill she talks him into going back and giving it another try—and when Bill murders him she feels responsible.

Proposed cast: Tom Wilkinson (Hollis)
Senior editor Hollis loves Alice and has seen her through affairs with two younger men.  Blaming herself for Bill's death and on drugs prescribed by Beryl that distort her horribly, she avoids him—until she rebels and Beryl kills him in front of her.

Pretentious Pictures presents a psychological thriller.
Reg’d © Library of Congress

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